What to do with it when you're done with it
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Recycle your U.S. EPA Source Reduction and Reuse

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U.S. EPA Source Reduction and Reuse

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U.S. EPA Source Reduction and Reuse

About

http://www.epa.gov/garbage/sourcred.htm During the past 35 years, the amount of waste each person creates has almost doubled from 2.7 to 4.4 pounds per day. The most effective way to stop this trend is by preventing waste in the first place Waste prevention, also know as "source reduction," is the practice of designing, manufacturing, purchasing, or using materials (such as products and packaging) in ways that reduce the amount or toxicity of trash created. Reusing items is another way to stop waste at the source because it delays or avoids that item's entry in the waste collection and disposal system. Source reduction, including reuse, can help reduce waste disposal and handling costs, because it avoids the costs of recycling, municipal composting, landfilling, and combustion. Source reduction also conserves resources and reduces pollution, including greenhouse gases that contribute to global warming. Containers and packaging represented approximately 28 percent of the materials source reduced in 2000, in addition to nondurable goods (e.g., newspapers, clothing) at 17 percent, durable goods (e.g., appliances, furniture, tires) at 10 percent, and other MSW (e.g., yard trimmings, food scraps) at 45 percent. There are more than 6,000 reuse centers around the country, ranging from specialized programs for building materials or unneeded materials in schools to local programs such as Goodwill and the Salvation Army, according to the Reuse Development Organization. Between 2 and 5 percent of the waste stream is potentially reusable according to local studies in Berkeley, California, and Leverett, Massachusetts. Since 1977, the weight of 2-liter plastic soft drink bottles has been reduced from 68 grams each to 51 grams. That means that 250 million pounds of plastic per year has been kept out of the waste stream.


Disposal Options

Businesses statewide that repair, rent, salvage and sell used products and surplus
KEEPING REUSABLE "WASTE" OUT OF LANDFILLS

Phone:
choices4life@yahoo.com
Don't see it here - Ask

Livingston County Habitat for Humanity
Accepts New and Used Building Materials

Phone: (810) 220-9986
lchfh@sbcglobal.net
www.livingstonhabitat.org

Salvation Army Thrift Store
Resells Donated Clothing, Furniture, Household Items

Phone: (517) 552-9278

http://www.salvationarmy.com